Valley of the Kings

Valley Of The Kings  | Luxor Travel Guide



The Valley of the kings is called in Arabic: Wadi El Muluk, and is usually visited during the bulk of Egypt Travel Packages and Egypt Day Tours also known as the Valley of the Gates of the Kings, is a valley in Upper Egypt where the Pharoahs of the new kingdom were burried  for nearly 500 years from the 16th to 11th century BC, rock cut tombs were cut into the mountain for the pharaohs.

 

The Valley of the kings is just a sun-blasted gorge of generic, red rock, but hidden underneath the earth are the tombs of nearly 70 pharaohs. Excavation is ongoing in some of them, but many are open to visitors on a rotating schedule to allow for restoration. Seeing the ornate decorations on the walls of these tombs and imagining the painstaking process necessary to create them is well worth the visit even in the hottest months.

 

It is located on the west bank of the Nile River in Luxor. It is the most famous site for the unique collections of tombs and breathtaking ancient ruins. That location makes it one of hottest spots for exploring ancient Egyptian history. Archaeologists have been sweeping the area of the Valley of the Kings for centuries, and till now it continues to surprise them.

 

The most precious find in the Valley of the Kings has kept archeologists busy for nearly two centuries. If all of the tombs here where open to visitors it would be nearly impossible to actually make it to all of them, but thankfully the possibility of such a huge task is eliminated for you.

 

The tourism authorities only open a few of the tombs at a time in order to allow for a continual cycle of upkeep and restoration. Regardless, there are certain to be several impressive tombs open at any one time. Be careful to heed the advice of your guide or guidebook on which ones to enter.

 

The most famous tombs are not necessarily the most impressive and a ticket to the Valley of the Kings only allows you to enter three tombs. A separate ticket is required to enter Tutankhamun’s tomb although you may find it a disappointing sight, especially given the extra cost.


During the New Kingdom’s period of the ancient Egyptian history (1539-1075 B.C.), the Valley of the Kings was the major burial ground for most of the royal pharaohs. The most famous pharaohs buried there were Tutankhamun, Seti I, and Ramses II. Also, you will find there the tombs of most of the 18th, 19th, and 20th dynasties queens, high priests, and other elites of that era. 


Remember that Tutankhamun was a relatively minor pharaoh, made famous by the fact that his tomb is the only one the valley that was discovered with its contents still inside, not by the grandeur of his tomb relative to the others. Those contents are now on display in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

 


Salima Ikram, a professor of Egyptology at American University in Cairo and a National Geographic grantee said that the ancient Egyptian pharaohs included so many things in their tombs including pieces of furniture, clothes, and jewelry. However, what remains a mystery is that they didn’t have any books buried with them.  


The most interesting fact was that tombs even included many kinds of food and drink, even wine and beer, as well as the precious objects that meant to help the deceased pass to the afterlife and achieve eternity, even the pharos favored companions and servants were buried with them.